How to tell everybody that your webpage is ok

Once you have tested your webpages, you want to tell everyone that you have cared about accessibility. In WCAG 1.0 you had the fancy logos, but they had a great problem: everybody could use them despite of being accessible or not.

Nowadays, the W3C is unable to verify each website that uses the logo, so the WAI tries to fix this problem using a conformance claim with the new logos:

Single-A
Level A conformance, W3C WAI Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0

<a href="http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG2A-Conformance" title="Explanation of WCAG 2.0 Level A Conformance"><img height="32" width="88" src="http://www.w3.org/WAI/wcag2A" alt="Level A conformance, W3C WAI Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0"></a>

Double-A
Level Double-A conformance, W3C WAI Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0

<a href="http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG2AA-Conformance" title="Explanation of WCAG 2.0 Level Double-A Conformance"><img height="32" width="88" src="http://www.w3.org/WAI/wcag2AA" alt="Level Double-A conformance, W3C WAI Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0"></a>

Triple-A
Level Triple-A conformance, W3C WAI Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0


<a href="http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG2AAA-Conformance"
title="Explanation of WCAG 2.0 Level Triple-A Conformance">
<img height="32" width="88" src="http://www.w3.org/WAI/wcag2AAA"
alt="Level Triple-A conformance, W3C WAI Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0">
</a>

Both conformance icons and claims refer to a single webpage, unless the webmaster includes an explicit scope information explaining which pages are covered by the claim and the icon. The pages can be a series of pages (e.g. a checkout) or multiple related webpages (e.g. a subdomain).

If you are really cool, you can conform to WCAG 2.0 without making any claim, because conformance claims are not required. Just be good at your job!

More info